Welcome to part two of our guide series to the various marks of Spitfire. We aim to bring you the lowdown on the key differences between the many versions that were produced, before, during and after the Second World War. Over time, we will be bringing...

SPITFIRE F.XIVc RM694 Rolled out from the Chattis Hill shadow factory in Hampshire on 22nd October, 1943 RM694 was built to contract No. 1877/c.23/(c) Req1/E11/43 from a build of 406 Spitfire XIV/XIX to batch No. RM670-713. Fitted with a Griffin 65 engine and a (C) type wing it...

What engine did the Spitfire have? The Spitfire was an engineering masterpiece, but no man-made object of such repute is ever designed in a vacuum. It will always be more than the sum of its component parts. As well as a cutting edge all-metal monocoque airframe and...

Many variations Spitfires used a variety of propellers during their time in service. By the end of the war, the Spitfire had been through 13 different designs. At the very beginning, the prototype and the initial Mk1s that followed it had a wooden two-bladed, fixed-pitch prop, which...

Flying in a Spitfire is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and the culmination of a lifetime’s ambition for many, so why not do it at a location with a rich history and walk in the footsteps of those brave young men who fought from here in 1939-1945? We...

The Biggin Hill Heritage Hangar, is currently home to three original two-seater Spitfires in which we offer passenger flights. These include a pair of T9s MJ772 and MJ627. MJ772 was built at Castle Bromwich in late 1943 and was delivered to No. 341 Squadron of...